Back

Jul

14

IMT HEADS DOWN UNDER WITH AWARD-WINNING WIRELESS EQUIPMENT AT SMPTE 2015

microLite VClip - on cameraSYDNEY, AUSTRALIA, JULY 14, 2015Integrated Microwave Technologies (IMT), a leader in advanced digital microwave systems serving the broadcast, sports, entertainment and law enforcement markets, will showcase its microLite HD Transmitter with V-Clip Docking at SMPTE 2015, at the stand of its regional reseller, Quinto Communications.

“We are excited to demonstrate our products with Quinto Communications at SMPTE, the premier event for the motion imaging and television engineering industries in the Australian region,” says John Payne IV, CTO, Integrated Microwave Technologies. “The microLite transmitter enables users to provide the very best in wireless-camera capabilities for a range of applications. It was recently used to provide the first live HD coverage from a drone at the U.S. Open in Chambers Bay, WA.”

Developed for the next generation of HD (SDI)-capable compact cameras, microLite addresses the current domestic and international broadcasting-band requirements within a single unit. All microLite HD transmitters are available in licensed 2-GHz and license-free 5.8-GHz frequency versions. The 2-GHz model covers from 1.9 to 2.5 GHz and delivers up to 200mW, while the 5.8-GHz frequency band unit has a robust 100-mW RF output. Depending on the mode and frequency, the transmitter has a range of up to one mile. The range and power can be increased from 200mW to one watt with the optional Range Booster Amplifier (RBA).

microLite features superb H.264 SD and HD encoding capabilities and operates in the standard 2k DVB-T COFDM mode. The H.264 video encoder supports the main profile of the H.264 standard, providing a 30-percent bit-rate reduction or video-quality improvement compared to encoders that only support the H.264 baseline profile. With the V-Clip battery docking, the mount is positioned on both sides of the clamshell transmitter, allowing it to be connected to the camera. The battery can then be mounted to the transmitter. As a result, users can employ the battery to power up the transmitter and to pass power through to the camera.